Published: 2013-10-17 12:02:40 Author: Source: New Fastweb Views: comment:

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According to ABC reports, chatting with friends about death in a cafe in the city on Saturday afternoon may not be a common way of leisure, but it is true in Brisbane.

Every Saturday afternoon, there are 20 people sitting in a cafe in the East End of Brisbane, eating cakes, drinking coffee, and discussing in detail how to best handle everything when life is about to end.

Nowadays, there are more and more death café activities internationally, and this one in Brisbane is also following suit. The organizer of the event said that if people start discussing about dying now, they may be able to go easier when this moment comes.

Sarah Winch, an Australian lecturer in health ethics, said he hopes that people can overcome the fear of death and instead focus on how they and their loved ones can pass away in the best possible state.

Winch was also one of the organizers of this death cafe in Brisbane. After her husband died of a brain tumor at the age of 48, she wrote a book on planning for death. After her husband was diagnosed, he chose not to go to the hospital for radiotherapy, but to spend the rest of his time with his family and do what he wanted to do.

Wen Qi said that many people disagree with death cafes because they believe that giving up treatment and accepting death is giving up hope. "You did not give up hope. On the contrary, a new hope is born, and that is to die contentedly."

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According to ABC reports, chatting with friends about death in a cafe in the city on Saturday afternoon may not be a common way of leisure, but it is true in Brisbane.

Every Saturday afternoon, there are 20 people sitting in a cafe in the East End of Brisbane, eating cakes, drinking coffee, and discussing in detail how to best handle everything when life is about to end.

Nowadays, there are more and more death café activities internationally, and this one in Brisbane is also following suit. The organizer of the event said that if people start discussing about dying now, they may be able to go easier when this moment comes.

Sarah Winch, an Australian lecturer in health ethics, said he hopes that people can overcome the fear of death and instead focus on how they and their loved ones can pass away in the best possible state.

Winch was also one of the organizers of this death cafe in Brisbane. After her husband died of a brain tumor at the age of 48, she wrote a book on planning for death. After her husband was diagnosed, he chose not to go to the hospital for radiotherapy, but to spend the rest of his time with his family and do what he wanted to do.

Wen Qi said that many people disagree with death cafes because they believe that giving up treatment and accepting death is giving up hope. "You did not give up hope. On the contrary, a new hope is born, and that is to die contentedly."