Sydney Today, on March 3, Eastern Time, Australia, a new apartment complex has a swimming pool or a gym, and people are very satisfied. Such days are gone forever.

Now nightclubs, bars, public dining facilities, poker rooms and yoga rooms are included in "vertical villages", which provide residents with public spaces. In this way, modern apartment buildings seem to have become fake hotels. The various living service facilities provided cater to the needs of more and more residents for high-end space and facilities not found in old residential buildings.

Developer Hamton's newly built Fifty Albert building near Albert Park Lake provides residents with a health club, day spa, on-site yoga, indoor garden rest areas and gatekeeper services on the ground floor. The top floor has a sun deck, hot tub, fully equipped barbecue equipment, kitchen, dining facilities, lounge, theater and poker room, everything.

Another notable building that will begin construction is the building named MY80 on A'Beckett Street, which will have a private rooftop nightclub and lounge on the 53rd floor. In addition to the swimming pool, the apartment also has a business center, cinema and barbecue platform.

The famous architect said that this act of adding elements of people's life is not just a marketing tool. Fifty Albert's designer Callum Fraser said on Elenberg Fraser architects: "The interesting thing about these buildings is to try to build a kind of vertical community."

Mr Fraser said that research done for Fifty Albert showed that people are not so interested in a gym or swimming pool and their costs, they are more concerned about services and places to relax. He said: "People can enjoy a variety of different spaces in such a building, whether it is a fitness center, a hot spring bath, or a public dining facility." Fifty Albert's focus has even expanded to hold Friday night drinks for residents in the lounge. The managers of the building will provide regular subsidies to the winery. Mr Fraser said: "This is part of the real service in this building."

Tom Jordan, the designer of Hayball, the company that built MY80, said that the construction of apartments and the cost of land drove the subsequent construction to provide more service facilities. According to a report by Oliver Hume Real Estate Group, the area of ​​one-bedroom apartments in Melbourne has fallen by an average of 8% in the past three years, and two-bedroom apartments have fallen by 19%. Mr Jordan said that the reduction in area does not mean that the design industry is bad. "From the principle of maximizing the use of design, we must ensure that every inch of area is fully utilized."

The design plan of a building should be determined according to the actual situation. Mr Jordan said that a large dining place is impossible for ordinary apartments, but MY80 residents can "book a dining room with a kitchen and roof balcony that can accommodate 15 people." The design of the apartment must also be Consider its surroundings. He said: "Any kind of facilities provided in an apartment building must complement the adjacent buildings."

Designers agree that this vertical village trend is also related to the influx of foreign developers. Mr Fraser said: "They come from a highly urbanized area and have a good understanding of the principles of vertical communities. They have brought new ideas. Apartments are both economical and affordable, and the public spaces they provide are also in line with people's living needs. "(Ivy)

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