Published: 2013-09-20 15:29:38 Author: Source: Ocean Daily Views: comment:

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When a 6-year-old boy in Wyoming, Central Coast, was playing tennis, the tennis ball rolled into the sewer and was covered with a funnel spider. He was then bitten by this spider. Experts warn that the early arrival of this year's spider season requires everyone's attention.

Fortunately, the NSW boy was not poisoned. The spider only sucked blood and did not inject venom.

His mother said: "After the spider bit the child, we were terrified. When he went to pick up the ball, the spider should have climbed onto the ball. The spider bit his finger and then immediately jumped away."

"Although it is very small, I knew right away that it was a funnel spider."

The boy's parents sent him to Gosford Hospital for treatment and observation. After being caught, the spider was sent to the Australian Reptile House.

Julie Mendezona, a spider researcher at the Reptile Museum, said the boy was lucky. In addition, only a female spider bit him. Male spiders are six times more venomous than females.

She said that the warm and humid weather meant that the spiders started moving early. "Funnel spiders will be active from now until February to March next year."

In the last spring and summer, there was an increase in spider bites in NSW, and the ambulance department treated a total of 288 bites. Among them, Sydney has the most cases, reaching 133.

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When a 6-year-old boy in Wyoming, Central Coast, was playing tennis, the tennis ball rolled into the sewer and was covered with a funnel spider. He was then bitten by this spider. Experts warn that the early arrival of this year's spider season requires everyone's attention.

Fortunately, the NSW boy was not poisoned. The spider only sucked blood and did not inject venom.

His mother said: "After the spider bit the child, we were terrified. When he went to pick up the ball, the spider should have climbed onto the ball. The spider bit his finger and then immediately jumped away."

"Although it is very small, I knew right away that it was a funnel spider."

The boy's parents sent him to Gosford Hospital for treatment and observation. After being caught, the spider was sent to the Australian Reptile House.

Julie Mendezona, a spider researcher at the Reptile Museum, said the boy was lucky. In addition, only a female spider bit him. Male spiders are six times more venomous than females.

She said that the warm and humid weather meant that the spiders started moving early. "Funnel spiders will be active from now until February to March next year."

In the last spring and summer, there was an increase in spider bites in NSW, and the ambulance department treated a total of 288 bites. Among them, Sydney has the most cases, reaching 133.