Published: 2013-09-10 15:24:59 Author: Source: New Fastweb Views: comment:

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With the spread of mosquitoes carrying Ross River Virus and Barmah Forest Virus, Australian scholars are now warning people to guard against mosquito bites in the coming months.

据国家法定传染病监测系统(NNDS)统计,澳洲年初至今共确诊3500宗罗斯河病毒病例(2012年4684宗),而确诊的巴马森林病毒病例大幅升至3465宗(2012年1722宗)。

According to the Melbourne Times, the travel medical service organization Travelvax is now issuing warnings to residents, and specifically reminds retired self-driving travelers, campers and ordinary travelers who go to southeast Australia, tropical Queensland and southwest Western Australia to visit the bushes. Anti-mosquito. However, Eddy Bajrovic, head of service organization, said that people in urban areas are equally vulnerable.

"It's not that you will be fine if you don't go to the jungle," he said. "We are seeing more and more reports of infections with the Ross River and Bama Forest virus in big cities."

Cameron Webb, an entomologist at the University of Sydney, said: “These two viral infections are also very common in southern states nowadays.” “In fact, more and more epidemics are appearing in big cities such as Sydney, Melbourne and Perth. the edge of."

It is understood that Perth is ushering in the Ross River Virus spring epidemic. As of August 8, 19 people in Perth and 31 people in the suburbs were diagnosed with Ross River Virus. It is estimated that the warmer weather in Sydney in the next three months, coupled with above-average rainfall, is also likely to usher in an infestation of mosquitoes.

Eddie said that the spread and migration of virus-carrying mosquitoes may be related to climate change and global warming. The city may become a habitat for mosquitoes. However, although these two viruses are not deadly, there is currently no effective treatment or vaccine. Some infected people will recover automatically within 6 weeks, but others will take longer.

It is understood that the symptoms of these two viruses may be severe and lasting for a long time. Common symptoms include drowsiness, swelling of joints and lymph nodes, muscle aches, skin rashes, fever and headaches.

In January this year, a Japanese tourist was unable to walk after being infected with the Ross River virus in Melbourne. Seven months ago, a woman in Perth was bitten by a mosquito in her back garden. She developed fever and joint pain shortly afterwards. She still cannot move her fingers completely.

Currently, another mosquito-borne disease with similar symptoms-dengue fever is emerging in the north of Townsville. However, most dengue fever reports in Australia (1238 so far) are cases of overseas infection.

Professor Weber said: “Indonesia, especially Bali, is at risk of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and dengue fever. Bali is very popular with Australian tourists due to its low prices.”

"The patterns of mosquito biting in Bali and other places are different. For example, they usually bite during the day. Australians often take it lightly when traveling to the local area and fail to take adequate protective measures."

"Therefore, tourists should use a protective agent containing DEET or Picaridin to actively prevent mosquitoes."

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With the spread of mosquitoes carrying Ross River Virus and Barmah Forest Virus, Australian scholars are now warning people to guard against mosquito bites in the coming months.

据国家法定传染病监测系统(NNDS)统计,澳洲年初至今共确诊3500宗罗斯河病毒病例(2012年4684宗),而确诊的巴马森林病毒病例大幅升至3465宗(2012年1722宗)。

According to the Melbourne Times, the travel medical service organization Travelvax is now issuing warnings to residents, and specifically reminds retired self-driving travelers, campers and ordinary travelers who go to southeast Australia, tropical Queensland and southwest Western Australia to visit the bushes. Anti-mosquito. However, Eddy Bajrovic, head of service organization, said that people in urban areas are equally vulnerable.

"It's not that you will be fine if you don't go to the jungle," he said. "We are seeing more and more reports of infections with the Ross River and Bama Forest virus in big cities."

Cameron Webb, an entomologist at the University of Sydney, said: “These two viral infections are also very common in southern states nowadays.” “In fact, more and more epidemics are appearing in big cities such as Sydney, Melbourne and Perth. the edge of."

It is understood that Perth is ushering in the Ross River Virus spring epidemic. As of August 8, 19 people in Perth and 31 people in the suburbs were diagnosed with Ross River Virus. It is estimated that the warmer weather in Sydney in the next three months, coupled with above-average rainfall, is also likely to usher in an infestation of mosquitoes.

Eddie said that the spread and migration of virus-carrying mosquitoes may be related to climate change and global warming. The city may become a habitat for mosquitoes. However, although these two viruses are not deadly, there is currently no effective treatment or vaccine. Some infected people will recover automatically within 6 weeks, but others will take longer.

It is understood that the symptoms of these two viruses may be severe and lasting for a long time. Common symptoms include drowsiness, swelling of joints and lymph nodes, muscle aches, skin rashes, fever and headaches.

In January this year, a Japanese tourist was unable to walk after being infected with the Ross River virus in Melbourne. Seven months ago, a woman in Perth was bitten by a mosquito in her back garden. She developed fever and joint pain shortly afterwards. She still cannot move her fingers completely.

Currently, another mosquito-borne disease with similar symptoms-dengue fever is emerging in the north of Townsville. However, most dengue fever reports in Australia (1238 so far) are cases of overseas infection.

Professor Weber said: “Indonesia, especially Bali, is at risk of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and dengue fever. Bali is very popular with Australian tourists due to its low prices.”

"The patterns of mosquito biting in Bali and other places are different. For example, they usually bite during the day. Australians often take it lightly when traveling to the local area and fail to take adequate protective measures."

"Therefore, tourists should use a protective agent containing DEET or Picaridin to actively prevent mosquitoes."