Since 2018, 38 people in NSW have been hospitalized for mushrooms, of which 27 were in the autumn. China and Australia have the opposite seasons. Australia is now in the autumn, which is the peak of mushroom growth. Health experts urge people not to use mushrooms on the roadside. Pick, let alone eat.

Benjamin Scalley of the NSW Department of Health said in a statement on Saturday: “Cold and wet weather provides a good growing environment for wild mushrooms. It is difficult for most people to recognize which are edible and which are poisonous.”
Scalley said: "Some mushrooms can be fatal, causing severe kidney and liver damage."

Knock on the blackboard! ! !

Poisonous mushrooms can cause severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, swelling and coma, and even death.

During 2014-2017, 281 people in NSW and the Capital Territory were hospitalized for mushrooms, and 900 people called poisoning hotlines for mushrooms. The most dangerous species is the death cap, which was found in Victoria and the Capital Territory earlier this month. In the Capital Territory, 2002 people have died from death caps since 4, and many have been poisoned.

Death Cap mushrooms are ordinary in appearance and are highly poisonous, and one mushroom can cause adult death. Symptoms of dead cap mushroom poisoning include severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

These symptoms may be relieved after one or two days, but this does not indicate recovery from the condition. Toxins are likely to cause severe damage to the liver, leading to death.

Dead Cap Poisonous Mushroom

Yellow-staining mushroom (Yellow-staining mushroom) is the main culprit of poisoning caused by eating wild mushrooms in Victoria. Eating yellow spot mushrooms can cause nausea, stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. The severity of symptoms varies with the amount consumed.

This mushroom looks very similar to the mushrooms we can often buy, cultivated mushrooms and edible wild mushrooms.

In urban areas, unfortunately, yellow spot mushrooms are more common than edible mushrooms. It can grow in large numbers in lawns and gardens.

Poisonous Mushroom

Some people think that by cooking, peeling or drying these poisonous mushrooms, the toxins can be removed!wrong! None of these methods can remove its toxins.Experts warned thatDon’t eat mushrooms that you didn’t buy from the store

And after a puppy died of eating poisonous mushrooms, pet owners need to be more careful. This pet dog named "Walter" is believed to have eaten poisonous mushrooms while walking in a green area in North Adelaide.
Only one day later, the seven-month-old "Walter" began to experience symptoms of vomiting and severe epilepsy, and eventually fell into a coma. It was rushed to the vet by the owner. Three hours after arriving at the vet, "Walter" died. Veterinarian Derrick McNair said that poisonous mushrooms usually affect the liver first, causing pets to experience symptoms of "jaundice", anorexia and feeling "drowsy."

John Swan, the owner of "Walter", said this was a terrible thing, and nothing could be worse than this. Seven News found that many potentially toxic wild mushrooms grow in the park in North Adelaide.

This incident has also triggered calls to the local city hall to remove such poisonous mushrooms and erect warning signs.

You must be especially careful when picking wild mushrooms. If you are not sure whether the mushrooms are poisonous, do not eat them. If you suspect that you or your child has eaten poisonous mushrooms, do not wait for symptoms to appear before seeking medical attention.

Please call immediately: 13 11 26 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week, applicable throughout Australia).

It is recommended to keep some edible mushrooms or take a picture for inspection by the poisoning information center. In some cases, experts can identify the mushroom species.

News source: https://www.sbs.com.au/news/nsw-health-authorities-warn-against-eating-wild-mushrooms