The rise of social media has led young people to take risks for perfect selfies, causing the death toll to rise.

(Image source: "Daily Mail")

From jumping "Gangnam Style" on Wedding Cake Rock in Royal National Park, NSW to shooting whales at Cape Solander in Sutherland Shire, Sydney,

More and more young people are betting their lives for the perfect shot.

(Image source: "Daily Mail")

The 2018 report disclosed that since 2011, more than 250 people have died due to taking pictures.An average of 43 people per year.

In July 2018, a 7-year-old American tourist took a selfie on the Cape Solander cliff and fell into the sea ten meters below and died.A month before, a man fell into the sea and died in the same location.This place is a famous whale watching spot.

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Sutherland Shire Mayor Carmelo Pesce said that people taking pictures in dangerous places don’t know what harm they will bring. “What about the people you leave behind, your family, friends, do you know how much they will be hit?”

He said, “I really don’t want to fence the coastline with fences. Some very popular places have been fenced off, but some people still ignore the warning signs.”

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This is the case with the popular Instagram attraction, the Wedding Cake Rock, which has attracted countless tourists.

This fragile rock has now been isolated,But the fence and the $3300 fine still cannot deter tourists who want to take perfect pictures.

(Image source: "Daily Mail")

NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service WarningThe sandstone layer of this rock is very soft, There is a high risk of collapse. “It’s beautiful here. We encourage people to take a look at the spectacular rock formations and take pictures, but the key point is to stand at a safe distance to appreciate it,” the authority said.

There was also a dangerous incident in the wildlife park near Phoenix, Arizona, on Saturday.

Leanne, a tourist in her 30s, saw a jaguar lying on the fence of the cage. She felt it was a perfect opportunity to take pictures. So she leaned over the safety fence and raised her camera to the tiger, not wanting the jaguar to suddenly stick out a paw. The fence scratched Leanne's arm.

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"I shouldn't cross the fence, but I think the zoo should also consider moving the fence back." She said.

She was sent to the hospital for treatment. Fortunately, her life was not in danger. After only a few stitches, she was discharged on the same day.

(Image source: "Daily Mail")