The knee is always painful and swollen, not necessarily knee arthritis, it may be a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath.

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is often mistaken for repeated swelling of arthritis
A 60-year-old woman injured her knee joint when she was young. Since then, her knee has been swollen and painful. She thought she was suffering from arthritis, but the treatment did not improve for decades. It wasn't until a period of time that her knee appeared severe swelling, and further examination revealed that the giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath had spread all over the blood vessels of the knee and even eroded to the bone.

Tendon sheath giant cell tumor (TGCT, also known as pigmented villous nodular synovitis) usually grows on the knee. It is a benign tumor caused by inflammation and hyperplasia of the knee bursa.

Tendon sheath giant cell tumor (TGCT, also known as pigmented villous nodular synovitis) usually grows on the knee. It is a benign tumor caused by inflammation and hyperplasia of the knee bursa.
Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (TGCT, also known as pigmented villous nodular synovitis) is difficult to treat if it grows in the joint.
"Generally speaking, it takes an average of two years for a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath to be diagnosed by a physician," said Wu Bogui, director of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Treatment and Research Center at Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Because its symptoms are knee pain, swelling and weakness, it can easily be mistaken for degenerative arthritis or sports injuries. Many patients cannot be cured for a long time, and the knee swelling is getting worse and worse. When they go to the hospital to draw the joint fluid, it is found that the blood-red fluid is drawn, and the diagnosis is confirmed.

To determine whether the knee pain is a simple injury, arthritis or a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, there is an obvious distinguishing feature, which is whether the knee is swollen. "Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is not likely to reduce the swelling," Wu Bogui said. "It disappears some, but it immediately swells up." So if repeated swelling lasts for several months, be vigilant.

The cause of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is related to injury, irritation or gene. The famous American orthopedic oncologist and professor of surgery, Dr. Richard Blackman, pointed out that if the tumor grows outside the joint, it is relatively easy to treat; but if it grows inside the joint, it will cause severe corrosion and destruction to the joint.

Surgery is the main treatment for giant cell tumor of tendon sheath
The most important method to treat giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is surgery. Through surgery, the tumor in the knee joint can be removed.

However, if the tumor is diffuse in a wide area, and even adheres to cartilage, ligaments, nerves and blood vessels, it is more difficult to remove it and it needs to be peeled off carefully. And this situation is easy to relapse. Therefore, after surgery, local low-dose radiotherapy may be required to further clean up the tumor and reduce the probability of recurrence.

Very few giant cell tumors of tendon sheaths can develop into malignant tumors. Malignant tumors can also be removed by surgery, but if the tumor swallows and destroys the function of the nerves and blood vessels in the legs, amputation may be considered.

4 kinds of sports maintenance, knee rehabilitation
Through rehabilitation exercise, patients with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath can better restore joint function. Three months after the operation is the golden period of rehabilitation.

Action XNUMX: Presser foot movement

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (TGCT) knee rehabilitation exercise one.
Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath knee joint rehabilitation exercise one.
1. Sit on the front half of the chair with buttocks, spread a towel on the floor, and place the foot on the side of surgery on the towel.

  1. The heel of the opposite foot is placed in front of the lateral ankle of the foot of the surgery side.
  2. Apply force to the opposite leg, bend the leg on the operating side to the tightest, and then press for 5 seconds. Release it slowly.

Action XNUMX: Pull the leg exercise

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (TGCT) knee rehabilitation exercise II.
Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath knee rehabilitation exercise II.
1. Sitting in a sitting position, stretch your legs forward, put a towel around the heel of one foot, pull the towel with your hands to bend your knees.

  1. When bending to the tightest, hold for 10 seconds. Then slowly straighten it out.

Action XNUMX: Lying position and leg lift exercise

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (TGCT) knee rehabilitation exercise XNUMX.
Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath knee joint rehabilitation exercise three.
1. Straighten the knees of one leg, raise the toes, and then slowly lift up.

  1. When you reach the highest point, hold for 3 seconds. Then slowly put it down.

Action XNUMX: Seated leg lift exercise

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (TGCT) knee rehabilitation exercise IV.
Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath knee joint rehabilitation exercise four.
1. Sit on a chair, support both sides of the chair with both hands, with your back close to the back of the chair.

  1. With your knees straight and your toes up, slowly lift your legs for 10 seconds.
  • Slowly and continuously, lower your legs.
  • Editor in charge: Li Qingfeng